Category Archives: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

Images from the Beaches of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific

Although we have posted pictures from our trip to the Marshall Islands in the past, and brief background information on the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the beauty and the majesty of this remote atoll have just been majestic! We thought a few more pictures at peak season in the middle of the summer are just apropos! Enjoy!

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Probably how paradise would look like! Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2017 to present.  All Right Reserved. Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel descriptions (if any) are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel descriptions (if any) are provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.                                                                                                                                                                                                   Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Memories of the Marshall Islands

The Marshall Islands, officially The Republic of the Marshall Islands: island country located near the equator in the Pacific Ocean, slightly west of the International Date Line. Geographically, the country is part of the larger island group of Micronesia. The country’s population of 55,000 people is spread out over 29 coral atolls, comprising 1,156 individual islands and islets. The islands share maritime boundaries with the Federated States of Micronesia to the west, Wake Island to the north, Kiribati to the southeast, and Nauru to the south.

The Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands in 1979 provided independence to the Marshall Islands, whose constitution and president (Amata Kabua) were formally recognized by the US. Full sovereignty or Self-government was achieved in a Compact of Free Association with the United States. Marshall Islands has been a United Nations member state since 1991. Politically, the Marshall Islands is a presidential republic in free association with the United States, with the US providing defense, subsidies, and access to U.S.-based agencies such as the Federal Communications Commission and the United States Postal Service.

CAPITAL: Majuro

HISTORY: Micronesian colonists reached the Marshall Islands using canoes circa 2nd millennium BC, with inter-island navigation made possible using traditional stick charts. Islands in the archipelago were first explored by Europeans in the 1520s, starting with Ferdinand Magellan of Portugal and Miguel de Saavedra of Spain. The islands derive their name from British explorer John Marshall, who visited in 1788. The islands were historically known by the inhabitants as “jolet jen Anij” (Gifts from God).

GEOGRAPHY: The Marshall Islands sit atop ancient submerged volcanoes rising from the ocean floor, about halfway between Hawaii and Australia, north of Nauru and Kiribati, east of the Federated States of Micronesia, and south of the territory of Wake Island. The atolls and islands form two groups: the Ratak (sunrise) and the Ralik (sunset). The two island chains lie approximately parallel to one another, running northwest to southeast, comprising about 750,000 square miles (1,900,000 km2) of ocean but only about 70 square miles (180 km2) of land mass; comparatively, appr the size of Washington, DC. The country consists of a total of 29 atolls and five isolated islands situated in about 180,000 square miles (470,000 km2) of the Pacific. The largest atoll with a land area of 6 square miles (16 km2) is Kwajalein.

CLIMATE: tropical; hot and humid; wet season May to November; islands border typhoon belt

TERRAIN: low coral limestone and sand islands.

ELEVATION: 2 m

GDP: US$ 189 mil (2017 est.)

GDP per capita: US$ 3,400 (2017 est)

GDP COMPOSITION: Agriculture 4.4%, Industry: 9.9%, Services: 85.7% (2013 estimates)

MARITIME: The Marshall Islands is a major trans-shipment center for fish, especially tuna. Marshall Islands is among the top five ship registries worldwide with appr. 3,500 vessels being registered in the Marshall Islands. International Registries, Inc. and its affiliates (IRI) provide administrative and technical support to the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) Maritime and Corporate Registries.

FLAG: Blue with two stripes radiating from the lower hoist-side corner – orange (top) and white; a white star with four large rays and 20 small rays appears on the hoist side above the two stripes; blue represents the Pacific Ocean, the orange stripe signifies the Ralik Chain or sunset and courage, while the white stripe signifies the Ratak Chain or sunrise and peace; the star symbolizes the cross of Christianity, each of the 24 rays designates one of the electoral districts in the country and the four larger rays highlight the principal cultural centers of Majuro, Jaluit, Wotje, and Ebeye; the rising diagonal band can also be interpreted as representing the equator, with the star showing the archipelago’s position just to the north.

NOTABLE WORDS IN THE MARSHALLESE LANGUAGE:

Welcome! – Iokwe!

Thank you! – Kommol tata!

Sources: Wiki Commons, CIA Factbook, IRI website, Karatzas Marine Advisors.


Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruising around coral atolls in the Marshall Islands! Image credit: Karatzas Images


More Images from Marshall Islands can be found by clicking here (Karatzas Photographie Maritime, May 13th, 2018)!


© 2017 to present.  All Right Reserved. Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel descriptions (if any) are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel descriptions (if any) are provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.                                                                                                                                                                                                   Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images of ‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse’, Stratford, CT

Stratford Point Light is a historic lighthouse in Stratford, Connecticut, United States, at the mouth of the Housatonic River. The original Stratford Point Lighthouse was built in 1822. In 1855 a fifth order lens was added to the 28-foot (8.5 m) wooden tower. In 1881, the tower and dwelling were razed and replaced with a 35-foot (11 m) tall, brick lined cast-iron tower and equipped with a third order Fresnel lens. The second tower was one of the first prefabricated cylindrical lighthouses in the country and remains active.

The lighthouse sits on a 4-acre (1.6 ha) tract at the southeastern tip of Stratford Point. Marking the entrance to Stratford Harbor, the lighthouse is off Prospect Drive from the airport. Grounds around the lighthouse are closed to the public.

Address: 1275 Prospect Dr, Stratford, CT 06615-7946

Latitude: 41° 09′ 07″ N
Longitude: 73° 06′ 12″ W

Stratford was involved in shipbuilding and the oyster industries, so Stratford Point lighthouse, was built in 1821 to accommodate the increasing traffic and the consistent foggy weather in the area. The lighthouse is sometimes referred to as “Lordship Light,” as the light is stationed on land that was part of an early settlement called Lordship.

The light was automated in 1970 with a modern beacon. It is an active aid to navigation and is used for Coast Guard housing.

The lighthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 29, 1990.

Station established: 1822
Present lighthouse built: 1881
Automated: 1970

Construction material: Cast iron with brick lining

Height of tower: 35 feet
Height of focal plane: 52 feet

Optics:
1855: Fifth-order Fresnel lens
1881: Third-order Fresnel lens
1906: Fourth-order Fresnel lens

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

‘Stratford Pt. Lighthouse, Est. 1882’ – living history. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

Images of ‘Highland Light’ at North Truro, Cape Cod (2)

The Highland Light (previously known as Cape Cod Light), an active lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore in North Truro, Massachusetts, on the Outer Cape Code, is the oldest and tallest lighthouse on Cape Cod, and the 20th lighthouse built in the USA. It is owned by the National Park Service (a Cape Cod National Seashore property) and cared for by the Highland Museum and Lighthouse, Inc., while the United States Coast Guard operates the light itself. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Highland Light Station.

In 1700, the town of Truro, Massachusetts, nine miles east of Race Point at the tip of Cape Cod, began its history under a different name—one it easily earned: “Dangerfield.” Even in calm weather, fishermen could suddenly find upon approaching land such a swell breaking that they dared not attempt to come ashore.

“I found that it would not do to speak of shipwrecks in the area, for almost every family had lost someone at sea,” Henry David Thoreau would later write about Truro in the December 1864 issue of Atlantic Monthly. “‘Who lives in that house?’ I inquired. ‘Three widows,’ was the reply. The stranger and the inhabitant view the shore with very different eyes. The former may have come to see and admire the ocean in a storm; but the latter looks on it as the scene where his nearest relatives were wrecked.”

Blindingly dense summer fogs lasting till midday that turn (in Thoreau’s words) “one’s beard into a wet napkin about the throat” provide conditions that to this day challenge even the most experienced mariner. The letter Reverend James Freemen wrote petitioning for a lighthouse near Truro stated that in 1794 more vessels were wrecked on the east shore of Truro than in all of Cape Cod.

On May 17th 1796, President George Washington signed the bill, along with $8,000 budget, authorizing a wood lighthouse to warn ships about the dangerous coastline between Cape Ann and Nantucket. It was the first light on Cape Cod, situated on ten acres on the Highlands of North Truro, was usually the first light seen when approaching the entrance of Massachusetts Bay from Europe.

The nation’s first eclipser was installed in the lantern room to differentiate Highland Light from others on the way to Boston, but delays in receiving it pushed the inaugural illumination back to January 15, 1798. With a focal plane of 180 feet above the sea, the light, with its array of lamps and reflectors, had the potential to be seen up to twenty-four miles, but the haze that often hung over the cape reduced the light’s visibility. Sperm whale oil was initially used in the light, but the fuel was later changed to lard.

In 1833, the wood structure was replaced by brick and in 1840 a new lantern and lighting apparatus was installed. In 1857 the lighthouse was declared dangerous and demolished, and for a total cost of $17,000, the current 66 foot brick tower was constructed, with a first order Fresnel lens from Paris. Along with the lighthouse, there was a keeper’s building and a generator shed, both of which can still be seen today.

In 1854, $25,000 was budgeted to rebuild Cape Cod Lighthouse on a proper site and to fit it with the “best approved illuminating apparatus to serve as substitution for three lights at Nauset Beach.”

Construction did not begin until 1856 on a new sixty-six-foot tower and a dwelling for the head keeper and a double-dwelling for his two assistants. The lighthouse was completed in October 1857, for $17,000, which included a new first-order Fresnel lens that produced a fixed white light. Before the addition of the first-order lens, the station had employed just one keeper.
The sixty-nine winding steps leading to the lantern room could be quite tricky for man.
In 1873, $5,000 was allocated for the station to receive a first-class Daboll trumpet fog horn that gave blasts of eight seconds, with intervals between them of thirty seconds. A frame engine-house, measuring twelve feet by twenty-four feet, was built for the fog signal along with a fuel shed.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, duplicate four-horsepower oil engines with compressors replaced the old caloric engines, reducing the time needed to produce the first blast of the fog signal from forty-five to ten minutes. In 1929, an electrically operated air oscillator fog signal was installed at the station as mariners complained that the old reed horns could hardly be heard above the heavy surf crashing on the beach below the station. Power for operating the new signal was furnished by a direct-current generator, driven by a four-cycle, internal-combustion engine that ran on kerosene.

On June 6, 1900, Congress appropriated $15,000 for changing the light’s characteristic from fixed to flashing. The new Barbier, Benard & Turenne first-order Fresnel lens had four panels of 0.92 meter focal distance, revolved in mercury, and gave, every five seconds, flashes of about 192,000 candlepower nearly one-half second in duration. While the new lens was being installed, the light from a third-order lens was exhibited atop a temporary tower erected near the lighthouse. After the new light was exhibited on October 10, 1901, the temporary tower was sold at auction.

In 1946, the Fresnel lens was replaced with a Crouse-Hinds, double-drum, rotating DCB-36 aerobeacon, which was in turn replaced during the automation process in 1987 with a Crouse-Hinds DCB-224 rotating beacon. The Fresnel lens was mostly destroyed during its removal, but a piece is on display at the lighthouse.

By the 1960s, the assistant keeper’s double-dwelling and fog horn building had been removed, and Keeper Isaac Small’s original ten acres had shrunk to little more than two. In the early 1990s, erosion seriously threatened the light. While in 1806, the tower had stood 510 feet from the cliff, by 1989, that distance had shrunk to just 128 feet.

Highland Lighthouse attracted visitors even when it was staffed by resident keepers. In 1922, 7,300 people registered at the lighthouse. Highland Museum and Lighthouse, Inc. was formed in 1998 as a non-profit to partner with the National Park Service in running a gift shop in the keeper’s dwelling and in offering tours of the lighthouse. After fifteen years in this role, the non-profit lost its contract due to operational issues, and on January 1, 2014, Eastern National was awarded the contract for operating the lighthouse.
The present location of the lighthouse is not the original site as beach erosion had rendered the original location dangerous. The structure was moved 450 feet (140 m) to the west from the cliff’s edge. The move was undertaken in 1996 at a cost of $1.5 million. The 430-ton structure was successfully moved intact on I-beams greased with Ivory soap.

Formerly a location associated with notable danger, the lighthouse presently is surrounded by an oceanfront golf course, the Highland Golf Course. After an errant golf ball broke a window, they were replaced with unbreakable material. The lighthouse grounds are open year-round on Highland Light Road in Truro, with tours and the museum available by the National Park Service during the summer months.

Highland Light Station is located on Highland Rd. in North Truro. Traveling north on Rte. 6, take the “Cape Cod/Highland Rd.” exit; turn right onto Highland Rd. and follow to the Highland Lighthouse area. Highland Light Station is situated on grounds owned by the National Park Service as part of the Cape Cod National Seashore and is managed by the Truro Historical Society. The grounds are open all year and the lighthouse is open May-October. A trip to the light station allows the visitor to enjoy the Interpretive Center, watch a 10-minute video and climb the lighthouse tower for a small fee. For further information, visit the Truro Historical Society‘s website or call 508-487-1121.

Sources:

Previously posted pictures by Karatzas Images of Lighthouse ‘Highland Light’ from 2014 can be seen here.

Cape Cod (Highland), MA, LighhouseFriends.com

Maritime History of Massachusetts 

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro; details of windows and thickness of walls. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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The Atlantic Ocean and the cliffs that were putting three widows in a house… Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

Buildings and Architecture of Harvard Business School (HBS)

Enjoying the great architecture of the Harvard Business School (HBS) campus in Boston. A soothing way to relax between classes and homework while walking down memory lane of American and international business history, and much more…

Harvard Business School: Educating Leaders Who Make a Difference in the World.

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Harvard Business School, entrance sign on Gordon Road. Established in 1908. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Inés’ by Jaume Plensa, 2013 located at the Aldrich Lawn. (Harvard Business School Announces Public Art Installations, June 2016). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Aldrich Hall (where most classes are held). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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MBA Class of 1959 Chapel with mechanical ‘sun clock’. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Recently dedicated, the Chao Center on HBS Campus. Proud seeing ship-owning success getting its name recognition. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Recently dedicated building on the HBS campus, the Tata Hall. Image credit: Karatzas images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

Listing Shipwreck in the Port of Piraeus, MV ‘Panagia Tinou’

On a recent visit to the Port of Piraeus in Greece, we have had the opportunity again to see our favorite shipwreck of the ferry boat MV ‘Panagia Tinou’. It has been almost a year and a half now that the Vessel has experienced ingress of water and developed starboard list while docked in the main ferry Port of Piraeus. The last owner has defaulted on debts to the Greek government, which has foreclosed on the Vessel. The shipwreck happened while the Vessel had been under the custody of the Greek government. A few attempts subsequently to sell the Vessel have been failed.

Considerations of safety, security and efficiency aside, the listing ship provides a weird spectacle in the port, almost an eerie feeling when experienced up-close.

During previous trips to Greece we have had the opportunity to take several pictures of the vessel from various angles and twice we have posted them on our blog Karatzas Photographie Maritime:

Images of Ferry MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus, in June 2016, and

Adventures of a Sinking Ship, in October 2016

This time we have had the opportunity to take pictures of the listing ferry under a winter, chilly sunset (appr. 6˚C) from the starboard side. Typically the dock on the Vessel’s starboard side is occupied by the ferries serving the route to the island of Crete; however, this time the dock was free and we had a chance to enjoy our personalized session with the shipwreck. Dear reader, we hope you have as much fun perusing this posting as we had when we were taking the pictures.

And just in case that someone in Greece is reading this post, we would like to ask why the guard asked us not to take pictures of the shipwreck and threatened to call the Greek Coast Guard on us. The shipwreck is on public property accessible to the public as a few hundred feet away ferries are docked and loading daily. There have been no signs whatsoever that photography, whether amateur or professional, is prohibited. Why then pictures cannot be taken? Not that we sweated the details and threats, we have taken more than 400 high resolution pictures during this session.

Enjoy the viewing!

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer for the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-4-bmk_9121

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-5-bmk_9247

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-6-bmk_9262

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-7-bmk_9270

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-8-bmk_9280

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-9-bmk_9312

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-10-bmk_9345

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-11-bmk_9359

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-12-bmk_9370

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

mv-panagia-tinou-13-bmk_9455

Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

Manhattan Skyline and George Washington Bridge on a New Year’s Day Sunset

Wishing our readers a most Prosperous and Happy New Year!

May all your dreams and wishes come true!

Today’s posting has pictures of the Manhattan skyline, the Hudson River and the George Washington Bridge (GWB). The shooting took place in the afternoon / evening of New Year’s Day 2017 when the weather was just winter perfect for the New York area; cold but not too cold (+2°C), sunny with long shadows typical of the winter in the north and clean atmosphere after several days of rain, snow and strong winds. A great deal of the pictures were shot from the Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ facing southbound; Hudson River separates the state of New Jersey from the State of New York (Borough of Manhattan, New York City), the water body seen in the pictures. Trying to visualize, Manhattan is generally seen from the northwest in the pictures. The new One World Trade Center tower can be seen at the bottom of Manhattan in the pictures (actually in Downtown Manhattan where the offices of Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co at One World Financial Place, on the 30th Floor, across the street from the World Trade Center); the tall, skinny building sticking out in Midtown Manhattan is the newly erected residential tower ‘432 Park Avenue’ with 85-floors above ground, world’s tallest residential building, in Billionaires’ Row. The Empire State Building, the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle, the Chrysler Building, the Bank of America Tower are distinguishable. The tall building standing out on the New Jersey shore at the bottom of the pictures is the Goldman Sachs Building (30 Hudson Street) in Jersey City, NJ; the green-glass tower of the Goldman Sachs (200 West Street) headquarters in Downtown Manhattan can be distinguished by the World Trade Center.

The George Washington Bridge (GWB) connects the state of New Jersey with the state of New York, and it’s located just north of the Fort Lee Historic Park in New Jersey; pictures of the bridge show the south part of the bridge and were shot from the New Jersey side. GWB is a double-decked, 14-lane, suspended bridge built in 1931; with over 100 million vehicles crossing the bridge each year, GWB is the world’s busiest motorist bridge; for those good at math, the toll for a passenger vehicle crossing the bridge eastbound is US$15; do the math! Pictures from the bridge were taken from the South Sidewalk, open to pedestrian traffic. The Little Red Lighthouse, officially Jeffrey’s Hook Light, is located by the New York pillar of the bridge and can be seen on the pictures taken from New Jersey; pictures of the lighthouse were taken from the road-level of the bridge, above, by the New York pillar.

The bridge has recently been in the news under the ‘Bridgegate’ heading.


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Winters sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winters sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Little Red Lighthouse as seen from above, at the road level of the Washington Bridge at the New York shore. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge, South Sidewalk, facing east (toward New York). Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge, South Sidewalk, facing west (toward New Jersey). Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge, facing east (New York). Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Heavy lift vessel MV ‘Industrial Skipper’ northbound passing under the bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Panoramic view of George Washington Bridge (GWB) as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Heavy lift vessel MV ‘Industrial Skipper’ northbound passing under the bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.