Buildings and Architecture of Harvard Business School (HBS)

Enjoying the great architecture of the Harvard Business School (HBS) campus in Boston. A soothing way to relax between classes and homework while walking down memory lane of American and international business history, and much more…

Harvard Business School: Educating Leaders Who Make a Difference in the World.

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Harvard Business School, entrance sign on Gordon Road. Established in 1908. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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The iconic Baker Building with the main library and professors’ offices. Formally known as the Baker Library / Bloomberg Center. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Inés’ by Jaume Plensa, 2013 located at the Aldrich Lawn. (Harvard Business School Announces Public Art Installations, June 2016). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Aldrich Hall (where most classes are held). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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MBA Class of 1959 Chapel with mechanical ‘sun clock’. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Recently dedicated, the Chao Center on HBS Campus. Proud seeing ship-owning success getting its name recognition. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Recently dedicated building on the HBS campus, the Tata Hall. Image credit: Karatzas images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

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Listing Shipwreck in the Port of Piraeus, MV ‘Panagia Tinou’

On a recent visit to the Port of Piraeus in Greece, we have had the opportunity again to see our favorite shipwreck of the ferry boat MV ‘Panagia Tinou’. It has been almost a year and a half now that the Vessel has experienced ingress of water and developed starboard list while docked in the main ferry Port of Piraeus. The last owner has defaulted on debts to the Greek government, which has foreclosed on the Vessel. The shipwreck happened while the Vessel had been under the custody of the Greek government. A few attempts subsequently to sell the Vessel have been failed.

Considerations of safety, security and efficiency aside, the listing ship provides a weird spectacle in the port, almost an eerie feeling when experienced up-close.

During previous trips to Greece we have had the opportunity to take several pictures of the vessel from various angles and twice we have posted them on our blog Karatzas Photographie Maritime:

Images of Ferry MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus, in June 2016, and

Adventures of a Sinking Ship, in October 2016

This time we have had the opportunity to take pictures of the listing ferry under a winter, chilly sunset (appr. 6˚C) from the starboard side. Typically the dock on the Vessel’s starboard side is occupied by the ferries serving the route to the island of Crete; however, this time the dock was free and we had a chance to enjoy our personalized session with the shipwreck. Dear reader, we hope you have as much fun perusing this posting as we had when we were taking the pictures.

And just in case that someone in Greece is reading this post, we would like to ask why the guard asked us not to take pictures of the shipwreck and threatened to call the Greek Coast Guard on us. The shipwreck is on public property accessible to the public as a few hundred feet away ferries are docked and loading daily. There have been no signs whatsoever that photography, whether amateur or professional, is prohibited. Why then pictures cannot be taken? Not that we sweated the details and threats, we have taken more than 400 high resolution pictures during this session.

Enjoy the viewing!

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer for the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Built in 1972 at Arsenal de la Marine National Francaise, France, as MV ‘Hengist’, now as MV ‘Panagia Tinou’ has developed a serious list int the Port of Piraeus. An inglorious end to long summer days, dreams and passions of the Aegean sun for many a vacationeer in the last couple decades. Image credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

Manhattan Skyline and George Washington Bridge on a New Year’s Day Sunset

Wishing our readers a most Prosperous and Happy New Year!

May all your dreams and wishes come true!

Today’s posting has pictures of the Manhattan skyline, the Hudson River and the George Washington Bridge (GWB). The shooting took place in the afternoon / evening of New Year’s Day 2017 when the weather was just winter perfect for the New York area; cold but not too cold (+2°C), sunny with long shadows typical of the winter in the north and clean atmosphere after several days of rain, snow and strong winds. A great deal of the pictures were shot from the Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ facing southbound; Hudson River separates the state of New Jersey from the State of New York (Borough of Manhattan, New York City), the water body seen in the pictures. Trying to visualize, Manhattan is generally seen from the northwest in the pictures. The new One World Trade Center tower can be seen at the bottom of Manhattan in the pictures (actually in Downtown Manhattan where the offices of Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co at One World Financial Place, on the 30th Floor, across the street from the World Trade Center); the tall, skinny building sticking out in Midtown Manhattan is the newly erected residential tower ‘432 Park Avenue’ with 85-floors above ground, world’s tallest residential building, in Billionaires’ Row. The Empire State Building, the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle, the Chrysler Building, the Bank of America Tower are distinguishable. The tall building standing out on the New Jersey shore at the bottom of the pictures is the Goldman Sachs Building (30 Hudson Street) in Jersey City, NJ; the green-glass tower of the Goldman Sachs (200 West Street) headquarters in Downtown Manhattan can be distinguished by the World Trade Center.

The George Washington Bridge (GWB) connects the state of New Jersey with the state of New York, and it’s located just north of the Fort Lee Historic Park in New Jersey; pictures of the bridge show the south part of the bridge and were shot from the New Jersey side. GWB is a double-decked, 14-lane, suspended bridge built in 1931; with over 100 million vehicles crossing the bridge each year, GWB is the world’s busiest motorist bridge; for those good at math, the toll for a passenger vehicle crossing the bridge eastbound is US$15; do the math! Pictures from the bridge were taken from the South Sidewalk, open to pedestrian traffic. The Little Red Lighthouse, officially Jeffrey’s Hook Light, is located by the New York pillar of the bridge and can be seen on the pictures taken from New Jersey; pictures of the lighthouse were taken from the road-level of the bridge, above, by the New York pillar.

The bridge has recently been in the news under the ‘Bridgegate’ heading.


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Winters sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winters sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Little Red Lighthouse as seen from above, at the road level of the Washington Bridge at the New York shore. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Winter’s sunset in New York on Year’s Day: Facing south the Hudson River; Manhattan skyline on the left, New Jersey to the right. One World Trade Center and 432 Park Avenue towers stand out. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge, South Sidewalk, facing east (toward New York). Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge, South Sidewalk, facing west (toward New Jersey). Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge, facing east (New York). Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Heavy lift vessel MV ‘Industrial Skipper’ northbound passing under the bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Panoramic view of George Washington Bridge (GWB) as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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George Washington Bridge as seen from Fort Lee Historic Park in NJ. Little Red Light can be seen at the foot of the New York suspense tower. Heavy lift vessel MV ‘Industrial Skipper’ northbound passing under the bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Poseidon’s Temple at Cape Sounion

Cape Sounion, at the southernmost tip of the Attica peninsula, is a promontory located appr. 70 kilometres (45 mi) south-southeast of Athens, Greece. The cape is the point for ships to enter the Saronic Gulf and reach the Port of Piraeus and the city of Athens and it’s an approximate cut-off point of the Aegean Sea.

According to Greek mythology and the founding myth of the city of Athens, Cape Sounion is the spot from where King Aegeus of Athens, leapt to his death off a cliff and thus giving his name to the sea. The Aegean Sea has been the backdrop of the Greek culture since historical records exist. It’s the sea where many city-states on smaller islands flourished, where great trade took place among Hellenistic and foreign peoples. To ancient Greeks in Athens, the Aegean Sea was the window to the world of the Dardanelles and the Black Sea (Hellespont, etc) to the north, to the eastern Mediterranean Basin (Phoenicians, Egyptians, etc) and to the western Mediterranean Basin (Romans, Carthaginians, etc) The Aegean Sea was the life and the blood of the ancient Greece (and of course, of the modern Greece).

What a better place for a temple to the god of Poseidon, brother of Zeus and a major deity among the Olympian gods, and the god in charge of keeping the seas and the waters in control? Cape Sounion is the location of a majestic temple to god of the seas, a great place from where to oversee his kingdom and stay in touch with his subjects, nested atop steep cliffs of appr. 60 meter high (200 ft), a place with commandeering views and fantastic sunsets, at the crossroads of the trading routes and still, a place close enough to the city of Athens.

Archaeological finds on the site date from as early as 700 BC. The original, Archaic-period temple of Poseidon on the site, was probably destroyed in 480 BC by Persian troops during Xerxes I’s invasion of Greece. The later temple at Sounion, whose columns still stand today, was probably built ca. 440 BC. This was during the ascendancy of the Athenian statesman Pericles, who also rebuilt the Parthenon in Athens. In 413 BC, during the Peloponnesian War against the Spartans, the Athenians fortified the site with a wall and towers to prevent it from falling into Spartan hands. This would have threatened Athens’ seaborne grain supply route from Euboea.

The temple of Poseidon was constructed in 444–440 BC, over the ruins of a temple dating from the Archaic period. The design of the temple is a typical hexastyle, i.e., it had a front portico with six columns. It has been hypothesized that it would have closely resembled the contemporary and well-preserved Temple of Hephaestus beneath the Acropolis, which may have been designed by the same architect.

The Poseidon building, with a southeastern orientation, is rectangular, with a colonnade on all four sides. The total number of original columns was 34; only 18 columns still stand today. The columns are of the Doric Order. They were made of locally quarried white marble. They were 6.10 m (20 ft) high, with a diameter of 1 m (3.1 ft) at the base and 79 cm (31 inches) at the top.

At the center of the temple colonnade would have been the hall of worship (naos), a windowless rectangular room, similar to the partly intact hall at the Temple of Hephaestus. It would have contained, at one end facing the entrance, the cult image, a colossal, ceiling-height (6 meters (20 ft)) bronze statue of Poseidon. Probably covered in gold leaf, it may have resembled a contemporary representation of the god, appropriately found in a shipwreck, shown in the figure above. Poseidon was usually portrayed carrying a trident, the weapon he supposedly used to stir up storms. On the longest day of the year, the sun sets exactly in the middle of the caldera of the island of Patroklos, the extinct volcano that lies a mile offshore, suggesting astrological significance for the siting of the temple. The temple of Poseidon was destroyed in 399 by Emperor Arcadius.

Archaeological excavation of the site in 1906 uncovered numerous artifacts and inscriptions, most notably a marble kouros statue known as the Sounion Kouros and an impressive votive relief, both now in the Athens National Archaeological Museum. A column from the temple can be seen in the British Museum.


Certain material on the blog has been reproduced by Wikipedia; an article on Poseidon and images of a marble statue of the god (Poseidon of Milos) from the National Archaeological Museum in Athens can be found at a previous posting on this blog.


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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Background info from the Department of Culture. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Additional background information. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; view of the portico. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; the south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. The south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; the south colonnade and the portico. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; the south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; south colonnade and portico. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the west; south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the west; south colonnade and partial view of the north colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. Detail of a column head from the south colonnade. The simplicity of the Doric Order is imposing. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from northwest. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from northeast. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east with a typical sunset. A god would be pleased only with the very best! Image credit: Karatzas Images

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I would not mind a temple with such a view every evening! Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Poseidon – The Olympian God of the Sea

According to Greek mythology and the story of the genesis of the gods of Olympus (Olympian Gods), Poseidon was the god of the sea and protector of all aquatic features. He spent most of his time in his watery domain, although he was officially one of the supreme gods of Mount Olympus. Also, while there were various rivers personified as gods, these would have been technically under Poseidon’s sway. Similarly, Nereus, the Old Man of the Sea, wasn’t really considered on a par with Poseidon, who was known to drive his chariot through the waves in unquestioned dominance. Poseidon had married Titan Oceanus‘ daughter, and sea-nymph Amphitrite.

Poseidon was a son of Cronus (the youngest of the 12 Titans) and of Cronus’s sister and consort Rhea, a fertility goddess. Poseidon was a brother of Zeus, the sky god and chief deity of ancient Greece, and of Hades, god of the underworld. When the three brothers deposed their father, the kingdom of the sea fell by lot to Poseidon. Zeus became ruler of the sky, Hades got dominion of the Underworld and Poseidon was given all water, both fresh and salt. Poseidon was widely worshipped by seamen.

His weapon and main symbol was the trident, perhaps once a fish spear, with which he could make the earth shake, causing earthquakes, and shatter any object. According to the Greek poet Hesiod, Poseidon’s trident, like Zeus’s thunderbolt and Hades’ helmet, was fashioned by the three Cyclopes. He was second to Zeus in power amongst the gods. He was considered by Greeks to have a difficult quarrelsome personality. Combined with his greed, he had a series of disputes with other gods during his various attempts to take over the cities they were patrons of.

In dividing heaven, the watery realm and the subterranean land of the dead, the Olympians agreed that the earth itself would be ruled jointly, with Zeus as king. This led to a number of territorial disputes among the gods. Poseidon vied with Athena to be patron deity of Athens. The god demonstrated his power and benevolence by striking the Acropolis with his three-pronged spear, which caused a spring of salt water to emerge. Athena, however, planted an olive tree, which was seen as a more useful favor. Her paramount importance to the Athenians is seen in her magnificent temple, the Parthenon, which still crowns the Acropolis. The people of Athens were careful, all the same, to honor Poseidon as well.

At one point , Poseidon desired Demeter. To deter him, Demeter asked him to make the most beautiful animal that the world had ever seen. So, in an effort to impress her, Poseidon created the first horse. In some accounts, his first attempts were unsuccessful and created a variety of other animals in his quest; thus, by the time the horse was created, his passion for Demeter had diminished. Poseidon himself fathered many horses, best known of which was the winged horse Pegasus by the Gorgon Medusa.

The Romans’ name for Poseidon was Neptune.


On a recent summer visit at the National Archeological Museum in Athens, we have had the opportunity to take several pictures of the statue of Poseidon of Melos. According to Wiki Commons:

The Poseidon of Melos is a statue of Poseidon in the National Archaeological Museum, Athens (NAMA), with the inventory number 235, which is dated to the last quarter of the second century BC.

The statue was found in 1877 on the island of Melos. It is made of Parian marble and has a height of 2.35 metres, which makes it more than lifesize. The statue was found in several pieces, which have been reattached to one another. Portions of the left foot and of the himation are modern recreations. Parts of the nose, beard and hair are missing.

The sea god is depicted naked to the waist in an awe-inspiring pose, with his muscular right arm raised, probably in order to hold a trident (now lost). His himation hangs around his hips, covering his legs and genitals; he holds it in place at his side with his left hand. His back is also partially covered; a bit of cloth lies, mysteriously suspended, on his left shoulder. His weight rests on his right leg, his left leg is left free. The musculature of his arms and his body generally are very finely worked. The head is slightly tilted to the left and his gaze is directed into the distance. There is a dolphin behind the statue to the right, which serves as an additional support for the weight of the statue. The pose is a standard one for Poseidon, Zeus and Hades.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Plaque at the base of statue ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Throwing his trident. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Detail of the head. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Detail of the dolphin by the right foot of the statue. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Detail of left hand supported at the waist, counter-balancing the right hand’s cast of the trident. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. View from the back. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

POSEIDON OF MILOS 13_whole body lef BMK_2696 @

Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

CAPE SOUNION 1_windy BMK_8951 @

Temple of the god of the sea Poseidon propitiously situated at Cape Sounion, a sharp promontory ca 65 km south of Athens. Image credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Images of Panama City

We have had the opportunity to visit Panama City to present at the 1st MareForum Conference, Panama: Singapore of the Western Hemisphere, just two days ahead of the official Panama Canal opening with the expanded locks. Never a person to meet a bit, a few lovely memories and pictures from Panama City with its rich history and amazing architecture.

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Welcome to colorful Panama! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

Panama Sign BMK_0930 @

Welcome to colorful Panama! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

Panama skyline BMK_1000 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama skyline BMK_1080 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama skyline BMK_1091 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama skyline marina BMK_1266 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama Architecture BMK_1410 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama F&F Tower BMK_1388 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. The F&F Tower (previously known as the Revolution Tower) of the green glass and twisted body stands out. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama F&F Tower BMK_0367 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. The F&F Tower (previously known as the Revolution Tower) of the green glass and twisted body stands out. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama F&F Tower BMK_0408 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. The F&F Tower (previously known as the Revolution Tower) of the green glass and twisted body stands out. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama skyline palms BMK_1207 @

An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Statue of Vasco Nunez de Balboa BMK_1232 @

Vasco Nunez de Balboa Square; first European to cross the Panama Isthmus (then) and reach the Pacific Ocean, in 15013. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Statue of Vasco Nunez de Balboa BMK_0789 @

Vasco Nunez de Balboa Square; first European to cross the Panama Isthmus (then) and reach the Pacific Ocean, in 15013. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Panama Old City BMK_1032 @

View of the old city, Panama City. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama Puente de las Americas BMK_0557 @

Bridge of the Americas (Puente de las Americas) spans the Panama Canal by Panama City and the Pacific Ocean. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama Puente de las Americas BMK_0479 @

Bridge of the Americas (Puente de las Americas) spans the Panama Canal by Panama City and the Pacific Ocean. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Panama Lighthouse BMK_0548 @

A lighthouse stands attentive by the Pacific Ocean, Panama Canal. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

Panama Containership Terminal BMK_0505 @

Panama containership terminal. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Memories of Posidonia 2016

With Posidonia 2016 just behind us, we share herewith a few memorable moments caught on camera; sorry, but no images of people or private citizens, or gossip!

For those interested in a quick analysis and our take of Posidonia 2016, the article from the Maritime Executive ‘Posidonia 2016 at BDI 600’ may be worth reading.


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Posidonia Central Plaza – at the Heart of Shipping. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Posidonia 2016 – The Venue, having accommodated 22,000 visitors in 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Model of liberty ship ‘Hellas Liberty’ on exhibit at Posidonia. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! ᾽Ναυπηγοἰ᾽ (Νaval Architects) in Ancient Greece were important people! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! ᾽Τριηροποιοι᾽ (Shipbuilders) in Ancient Greece were important people! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! And a model of a Trireme! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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From the old, to the new! Union Greek Shipowners (UGS) celebrating 100 years! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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A book about Swedish Shipping! Always we had a soft spot for Sverige! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Who said romance is dead? Great way to attract attention to one’s booth! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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The section for Japan at Posidonia. We always had a soft spot for the Country of the Rising Sun, too! Credit Image: Karatzas Images

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His Excellency, the Ambassador of Japan to Greece, Mr Masuo Nishibayashi, speaking at the Japan’s Ship Exporters Association reception. Credit Image: Karatzas Images

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The Minister of State for Transport of the UK, Mr Robert Goodwill MP, speaking at the British Residence, British Embassy in Athens during Posidonia 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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A World-class Maritime Centre: Maritime UK – at the British Residence, British Embassy in Athens during Posidonia 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ main ferry port, ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ heavily listing. For more images, please see Images of Ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ main ferry port, ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ heavily listing. For more images, please see Images of Ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ containership terminal, 9,300-teu vessel MV ‘CMA CGM Arkansas’ unloading containers at the Cosco terminal. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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