Tag Archives: Basil Karatzas

Images of ‘Highland Light’ at North Truro, Cape Cod (2)

The Highland Light (previously known as Cape Cod Light), an active lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore in North Truro, Massachusetts, on the Outer Cape Code, is the oldest and tallest lighthouse on Cape Cod, and the 20th lighthouse built in the USA. It is owned by the National Park Service (a Cape Cod National Seashore property) and cared for by the Highland Museum and Lighthouse, Inc., while the United States Coast Guard operates the light itself. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Highland Light Station.

In 1700, the town of Truro, Massachusetts, nine miles east of Race Point at the tip of Cape Cod, began its history under a different name—one it easily earned: “Dangerfield.” Even in calm weather, fishermen could suddenly find upon approaching land such a swell breaking that they dared not attempt to come ashore.

“I found that it would not do to speak of shipwrecks in the area, for almost every family had lost someone at sea,” Henry David Thoreau would later write about Truro in the December 1864 issue of Atlantic Monthly. “‘Who lives in that house?’ I inquired. ‘Three widows,’ was the reply. The stranger and the inhabitant view the shore with very different eyes. The former may have come to see and admire the ocean in a storm; but the latter looks on it as the scene where his nearest relatives were wrecked.”

Blindingly dense summer fogs lasting till midday that turn (in Thoreau’s words) “one’s beard into a wet napkin about the throat” provide conditions that to this day challenge even the most experienced mariner. The letter Reverend James Freemen wrote petitioning for a lighthouse near Truro stated that in 1794 more vessels were wrecked on the east shore of Truro than in all of Cape Cod.

On May 17th 1796, President George Washington signed the bill, along with $8,000 budget, authorizing a wood lighthouse to warn ships about the dangerous coastline between Cape Ann and Nantucket. It was the first light on Cape Cod, situated on ten acres on the Highlands of North Truro, was usually the first light seen when approaching the entrance of Massachusetts Bay from Europe.

The nation’s first eclipser was installed in the lantern room to differentiate Highland Light from others on the way to Boston, but delays in receiving it pushed the inaugural illumination back to January 15, 1798. With a focal plane of 180 feet above the sea, the light, with its array of lamps and reflectors, had the potential to be seen up to twenty-four miles, but the haze that often hung over the cape reduced the light’s visibility. Sperm whale oil was initially used in the light, but the fuel was later changed to lard.

In 1833, the wood structure was replaced by brick and in 1840 a new lantern and lighting apparatus was installed. In 1857 the lighthouse was declared dangerous and demolished, and for a total cost of $17,000, the current 66 foot brick tower was constructed, with a first order Fresnel lens from Paris. Along with the lighthouse, there was a keeper’s building and a generator shed, both of which can still be seen today.

In 1854, $25,000 was budgeted to rebuild Cape Cod Lighthouse on a proper site and to fit it with the “best approved illuminating apparatus to serve as substitution for three lights at Nauset Beach.”

Construction did not begin until 1856 on a new sixty-six-foot tower and a dwelling for the head keeper and a double-dwelling for his two assistants. The lighthouse was completed in October 1857, for $17,000, which included a new first-order Fresnel lens that produced a fixed white light. Before the addition of the first-order lens, the station had employed just one keeper.
The sixty-nine winding steps leading to the lantern room could be quite tricky for man.
In 1873, $5,000 was allocated for the station to receive a first-class Daboll trumpet fog horn that gave blasts of eight seconds, with intervals between them of thirty seconds. A frame engine-house, measuring twelve feet by twenty-four feet, was built for the fog signal along with a fuel shed.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, duplicate four-horsepower oil engines with compressors replaced the old caloric engines, reducing the time needed to produce the first blast of the fog signal from forty-five to ten minutes. In 1929, an electrically operated air oscillator fog signal was installed at the station as mariners complained that the old reed horns could hardly be heard above the heavy surf crashing on the beach below the station. Power for operating the new signal was furnished by a direct-current generator, driven by a four-cycle, internal-combustion engine that ran on kerosene.

On June 6, 1900, Congress appropriated $15,000 for changing the light’s characteristic from fixed to flashing. The new Barbier, Benard & Turenne first-order Fresnel lens had four panels of 0.92 meter focal distance, revolved in mercury, and gave, every five seconds, flashes of about 192,000 candlepower nearly one-half second in duration. While the new lens was being installed, the light from a third-order lens was exhibited atop a temporary tower erected near the lighthouse. After the new light was exhibited on October 10, 1901, the temporary tower was sold at auction.

In 1946, the Fresnel lens was replaced with a Crouse-Hinds, double-drum, rotating DCB-36 aerobeacon, which was in turn replaced during the automation process in 1987 with a Crouse-Hinds DCB-224 rotating beacon. The Fresnel lens was mostly destroyed during its removal, but a piece is on display at the lighthouse.

By the 1960s, the assistant keeper’s double-dwelling and fog horn building had been removed, and Keeper Isaac Small’s original ten acres had shrunk to little more than two. In the early 1990s, erosion seriously threatened the light. While in 1806, the tower had stood 510 feet from the cliff, by 1989, that distance had shrunk to just 128 feet.

Highland Lighthouse attracted visitors even when it was staffed by resident keepers. In 1922, 7,300 people registered at the lighthouse. Highland Museum and Lighthouse, Inc. was formed in 1998 as a non-profit to partner with the National Park Service in running a gift shop in the keeper’s dwelling and in offering tours of the lighthouse. After fifteen years in this role, the non-profit lost its contract due to operational issues, and on January 1, 2014, Eastern National was awarded the contract for operating the lighthouse.
The present location of the lighthouse is not the original site as beach erosion had rendered the original location dangerous. The structure was moved 450 feet (140 m) to the west from the cliff’s edge. The move was undertaken in 1996 at a cost of $1.5 million. The 430-ton structure was successfully moved intact on I-beams greased with Ivory soap.

Formerly a location associated with notable danger, the lighthouse presently is surrounded by an oceanfront golf course, the Highland Golf Course. After an errant golf ball broke a window, they were replaced with unbreakable material. The lighthouse grounds are open year-round on Highland Light Road in Truro, with tours and the museum available by the National Park Service during the summer months.

Highland Light Station is located on Highland Rd. in North Truro. Traveling north on Rte. 6, take the “Cape Cod/Highland Rd.” exit; turn right onto Highland Rd. and follow to the Highland Lighthouse area. Highland Light Station is situated on grounds owned by the National Park Service as part of the Cape Cod National Seashore and is managed by the Truro Historical Society. The grounds are open all year and the lighthouse is open May-October. A trip to the light station allows the visitor to enjoy the Interpretive Center, watch a 10-minute video and climb the lighthouse tower for a small fee. For further information, visit the Truro Historical Society‘s website or call 508-487-1121.

Sources:

Previously posted pictures by Karatzas Images of Lighthouse ‘Highland Light’ from 2014 can be seen here.

Cape Cod (Highland), MA, LighhouseFriends.com

Maritime History of Massachusetts 

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at dawn on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro at sunrise on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro; details of windows and thickness of walls. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Highland Light (Cape Cod Light) at N. Truro on a winter morning. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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The Atlantic Ocean and the cliffs that were putting three widows in a house… Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

Poseidon’s Temple at Cape Sounion

Cape Sounion, at the southernmost tip of the Attica peninsula, is a promontory located appr. 70 kilometres (45 mi) south-southeast of Athens, Greece. The cape is the point for ships to enter the Saronic Gulf and reach the Port of Piraeus and the city of Athens and it’s an approximate cut-off point of the Aegean Sea.

According to Greek mythology and the founding myth of the city of Athens, Cape Sounion is the spot from where King Aegeus of Athens, leapt to his death off a cliff and thus giving his name to the sea. The Aegean Sea has been the backdrop of the Greek culture since historical records exist. It’s the sea where many city-states on smaller islands flourished, where great trade took place among Hellenistic and foreign peoples. To ancient Greeks in Athens, the Aegean Sea was the window to the world of the Dardanelles and the Black Sea (Hellespont, etc) to the north, to the eastern Mediterranean Basin (Phoenicians, Egyptians, etc) and to the western Mediterranean Basin (Romans, Carthaginians, etc) The Aegean Sea was the life and the blood of the ancient Greece (and of course, of the modern Greece).

What a better place for a temple to the god of Poseidon, brother of Zeus and a major deity among the Olympian gods, and the god in charge of keeping the seas and the waters in control? Cape Sounion is the location of a majestic temple to god of the seas, a great place from where to oversee his kingdom and stay in touch with his subjects, nested atop steep cliffs of appr. 60 meter high (200 ft), a place with commandeering views and fantastic sunsets, at the crossroads of the trading routes and still, a place close enough to the city of Athens.

Archaeological finds on the site date from as early as 700 BC. The original, Archaic-period temple of Poseidon on the site, was probably destroyed in 480 BC by Persian troops during Xerxes I’s invasion of Greece. The later temple at Sounion, whose columns still stand today, was probably built ca. 440 BC. This was during the ascendancy of the Athenian statesman Pericles, who also rebuilt the Parthenon in Athens. In 413 BC, during the Peloponnesian War against the Spartans, the Athenians fortified the site with a wall and towers to prevent it from falling into Spartan hands. This would have threatened Athens’ seaborne grain supply route from Euboea.

The temple of Poseidon was constructed in 444–440 BC, over the ruins of a temple dating from the Archaic period. The design of the temple is a typical hexastyle, i.e., it had a front portico with six columns. It has been hypothesized that it would have closely resembled the contemporary and well-preserved Temple of Hephaestus beneath the Acropolis, which may have been designed by the same architect.

The Poseidon building, with a southeastern orientation, is rectangular, with a colonnade on all four sides. The total number of original columns was 34; only 18 columns still stand today. The columns are of the Doric Order. They were made of locally quarried white marble. They were 6.10 m (20 ft) high, with a diameter of 1 m (3.1 ft) at the base and 79 cm (31 inches) at the top.

At the center of the temple colonnade would have been the hall of worship (naos), a windowless rectangular room, similar to the partly intact hall at the Temple of Hephaestus. It would have contained, at one end facing the entrance, the cult image, a colossal, ceiling-height (6 meters (20 ft)) bronze statue of Poseidon. Probably covered in gold leaf, it may have resembled a contemporary representation of the god, appropriately found in a shipwreck, shown in the figure above. Poseidon was usually portrayed carrying a trident, the weapon he supposedly used to stir up storms. On the longest day of the year, the sun sets exactly in the middle of the caldera of the island of Patroklos, the extinct volcano that lies a mile offshore, suggesting astrological significance for the siting of the temple. The temple of Poseidon was destroyed in 399 by Emperor Arcadius.

Archaeological excavation of the site in 1906 uncovered numerous artifacts and inscriptions, most notably a marble kouros statue known as the Sounion Kouros and an impressive votive relief, both now in the Athens National Archaeological Museum. A column from the temple can be seen in the British Museum.


Certain material on the blog has been reproduced by Wikipedia; an article on Poseidon and images of a marble statue of the god (Poseidon of Milos) from the National Archaeological Museum in Athens can be found at a previous posting on this blog.


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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Background info from the Department of Culture. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Additional background information. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; view of the portico. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; the south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. The south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; the south colonnade and the portico. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; the south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east side; south colonnade and portico. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the west; south colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the west; south colonnade and partial view of the north colonnade. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. Detail of a column head from the south colonnade. The simplicity of the Doric Order is imposing. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from northwest. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from northeast. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. As seen from the east with a typical sunset. A god would be pleased only with the very best! Image credit: Karatzas Images

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I would not mind a temple with such a view every evening! Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Memories of Posidonia 2016

With Posidonia 2016 just behind us, we share herewith a few memorable moments caught on camera; sorry, but no images of people or private citizens, or gossip!

For those interested in a quick analysis and our take of Posidonia 2016, the article from the Maritime Executive ‘Posidonia 2016 at BDI 600’ may be worth reading.


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Posidonia Central Plaza – at the Heart of Shipping. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Posidonia 2016 – The Venue, having accommodated 22,000 visitors in 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Model of liberty ship ‘Hellas Liberty’ on exhibit at Posidonia. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! ᾽Ναυπηγοἰ᾽ (Νaval Architects) in Ancient Greece were important people! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! ᾽Τριηροποιοι᾽ (Shipbuilders) in Ancient Greece were important people! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! And a model of a Trireme! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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From the old, to the new! Union Greek Shipowners (UGS) celebrating 100 years! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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A book about Swedish Shipping! Always we had a soft spot for Sverige! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Who said romance is dead? Great way to attract attention to one’s booth! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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The section for Japan at Posidonia. We always had a soft spot for the Country of the Rising Sun, too! Credit Image: Karatzas Images

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His Excellency, the Ambassador of Japan to Greece, Mr Masuo Nishibayashi, speaking at the Japan’s Ship Exporters Association reception. Credit Image: Karatzas Images

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The Minister of State for Transport of the UK, Mr Robert Goodwill MP, speaking at the British Residence, British Embassy in Athens during Posidonia 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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A World-class Maritime Centre: Maritime UK – at the British Residence, British Embassy in Athens during Posidonia 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ main ferry port, ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ heavily listing. For more images, please see Images of Ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ main ferry port, ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ heavily listing. For more images, please see Images of Ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ containership terminal, 9,300-teu vessel MV ‘CMA CGM Arkansas’ unloading containers at the Cosco terminal. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Key West Beach Rules

Treasure Hunting in Key West, Florida…

Of writers and poets and pirates                                                                                                           who walked the dirt beneath this path                                                                                                  each carrying a pocket full of dreams.                                                                                                    And none as unusual as yours,                                                                                                              but all of which came true.                                                                                                                                                  David L. Sloan                                                                                                                                                

Kew West_There's no place I'd rather be

Key West, There’s no place I’d rather be

Of poets and dreamers_SLOAN

Of writers, poets and pirates…

Write your worries in the sand

Write your worries in the sand… and let the sea wash them away

You can shake the sand off your shoes

Sand never leaves the soul…

Happines is

Toes in the water…

Home is where the ocean meets the shore

Where the ocean meets the shore…

sandy toes and salty kisses

Sandy toes and salty kisses!

Go jump in the ocean

Go jump in the ocean! – Can never be taken as an insult!

If you are lucky enough to be at the beach

if you are lucky enough to be at the beach…

On beach time

On beach time…

Beach rules

Beach rules…

Beach rules 2

And, more beach rules…

Captain's Rules

And, some Captain’s rules…

Crew knows best

The crew knows best!

same ship...different day

Same ship…different day! Not a good motto for a shipbroker!

No working on drinking hours

No working during drinking hours! – Well, how a shipbroker is supposed to get anything done then?

Dream require wide open seas

Wild dreams, open seas!

Inner compass

Inner compass!

Best ships are friendships

Best ships are friendSHIPS!

Shell warehouse

She sells sea shells by the sea shore! Key West!

Bart Roberts

‘In an honest service there is thin commons, low wages and hard labor; in this plenty and satiety, pleasure and ease, liberty and power… No, a merry life and a short one will be my motto.’                                                                                  Captain Bartholomew ‘Black Bart’ Roberts, Pirate

As legendary Steve Jobs once said: ‘It’s more fun to be a pirate than to join the Navy’!


 

© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Shipping IPOs

Capital markets and shipping IPOs are once again a hot topic in shipping; high prospects and expectations from a new crop of shipping companies, quite a few now sponsored by institutional investors. Hopefully, this new round of shipping IPOs will manage to bring to the public markets a more distinguished management style than the shipping IPOs of the last decade.

Interesting article in the Tanker Operator magazine, June 2014 issue.

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Tanker Operator article on shipping IPOs – May 2014

Please feel free to access the article in pdf here!

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A watchful eye in shipping!© 2013-2014 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.


 

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

 

Media Mentions for Basil Karatzas

We are taking pride to always be up-to-date with our business , and, if possible, a little ahead, as famously once a highly successful executive of a top notch company presciently said. At the shipping finance advisory and ship broking firm Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., we measure our success not only by the number and size of the transactions we work on and successfully conclude, and the caliber of the shipowners and clients we work with, but also by the times we were honored to provide current market information, insight, opinion and counsel to maritime, finance and trade topics to highly respected publications.

A few recent articles where Basil M. Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co. were in the press:

Monetary controls in Greece squeeze consumers and business, June 29th, 2015, The New York Times. Basil Karatzas is quoted in reference to the impact of the bank closings and imposition of capital controls may have to the shipping industry. Link to a pdf version of the article can be found here.

Ships scrapped as freight rates fall, June 12, 2015, The Wall Street Journal. Basil Karatzas is quoted in reference to increased levels of demolition of older vessels in a weak freight environment and the impact on the shipping markets. Link to a pdf version of the article can be found here.

Costly bet on big cargo ships comes up short, June 1, 2015, the Wall Street Journal. Containerships have more than doubled in size in the last seven years, and ambitions are high for even bigger ships; however efficiencies are not always commensurate as the rest of the supply chain has to improve. Link to a pdf version of the article can be found here.

Financial distress plagues dry-bulk carriers, June 16, 2015, Daily Bankruptcy Review, Dow Jones. Article on page 10. With dry-bulk freight rates hovering at 30-year lows, most types of dry bulk vessels are operating below cash breakeven; once the seasonally slow summer is over, filings in the US and elsewhere can get a second wave.

Additional links to articles and media mentions for Basil Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co. can be found on the Shipping Finance by Karatzas Marine blog by following the link here.

Happy reading!


© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

2015 06JUN29 NYT Monetary Controls in Greece Squeeze Consumers and Businesses_HL

2015 06JUN13 WSJ Ships Scrapped as Freight Rates Fall_HL

2015 06JUN01 WSJ Costly Bet on Big Cargo Ships Comes Up Short_HL

2015 06JUN16 DAILY BANKRUPTCY REVIEW Financial Distress Plagues Dry-Bulk Carriers

Third party copyrights are fully acknowledged and attributed as stated or required.

Fairplay Feature

‘Fairplay’ Profiles Bail M Karatzas and Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.

The January 8th, 2015 issue of the well-respected international shipping weekly publication ‘Fairplay’ (published since 1883) has honored in its weekly ‘Profile’ pages Basil M. Karatzas, CEO of Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., and Managing Partner of Karatzas Maritime Capital Management. Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., based in Manhattan, has been acting as shipbroker and shipping finance advisor to shipowners, institutional investors, banks and leasing companies worldwide. Karatzas Maritime Capital Management has been investing along its clients in transactions in the shipping and maritime sectors.

It has been a tremendous horor for the firm and its principals to be recognized so prominently in such well established trade publication and reflects on the progress, success and reputation the firm and its principals have been enjoying since the inception of the firm in 2011. The firm is extremely thankful and appreciative of the trust and support its clients have placed in its principals and business practices, and looking forward to successfully grow along its clients; ‘by doing always your best and placing clients’ interests first, success will come and that soon,’ as Basil Karatzas delights to remind in the office.

An online version of the article can be found by following the link herewith, while a pdf version of the story can be found herebelow:

2015 01JAN08 FAIRPLAY_Profile 8 Jan 2015 Fairplay p2_Page_2 Articles and documents in this posting are copyrighted material of Faiplay and IHS Fairplay 24.


 

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