Tag Archives: Port of Hamburg

Images of Museum Ship SS ‘Stettin’ in the Port of Hamburg

Images of Museum Ship SS ‘Stettin’, an ice breaker, in the Port of Hamburg

SS Stettin
Status: Museum ship
Owner: Association Dampf-Eisbrecher Stettin e.V.,Hamburg
Builder: Stettiner Oderwerke
Yard number: 769
Launched: 7 September 1933
Christened: 16 November 1933
Out of service: 1981

General characteristics
Class and Notation: Germanischer Lloyd 100 A5 K E
Tonnage: 783 tons
Displacement: 1,138 tons
Length: 51.75 m
Beam: 13.43 m
Height: 6.45 m
Draught: 5.40 m
Installed power: Steam, 2,200 hp at 115 rpm
Propulsion: 3-cylinder-expansion steam-piston engine with Stephenson ex-center-control
Crew: 22


Stettin is a steam icebreaker built by the shipyard Stettiner Oderwerke in 1933. She was ordered by the Chamber of Commerce of Stettin (until 1945 Germany, since 1945 Szczecin, Poland). The economy of the city of Stettin strongly depended on the free access of ships to and from the Baltic Sea. Therefore, icebreakers were used to keep the shipping channels free from ice during the winter.

For the first time in Germany, the construction was characterized by a new bow design called Runeberg-bow. This new bow design broke the ice using a novel method. It was not broken by the weight of the ship but by a sharp cutting edge. Future development of icebreakers was influenced by this bow form.

Although diesel-engines were already in wide use by 1933, Stettin was equipped with a steam piston engine. Unlike diesel engines, steam piston engines can be reversed within a very short period of approximately 3 to 4 seconds. This was important during manoeuvres of the ship under icey conditions in order to liberate the ship if it were to get stuck. The icebreakers of Stettin were handled by the shipping company Braeunlich, which ran a seaside resort ferry service along the coast during the summer. Its other ships had similar engines, so a single technical staff could be employed year round. Stettin was run by a crew of 22 men. This system was in place until the end of World War II.

With the special hull design and an engine power with a maximum horsepower of 2200, measured at the cylinders, Stettin was able to break ice up to a thickness of half a meter, at a constant speed of one to two knots. Thicker ice could only be broken by boxing. Boxing was a process in which the ship ran several attacks until the ice gave way.

From 1933 to 1945, Stettin was used on the Oder River between Stettin and Swinemünde (Świnoujście), as well as on the Baltic Sea, in German Navy (Kriegsmarine) service. On the night of 8 April 1940, Stettin participated in the capture of Copenhagen by participating in a surprise landing of German troops in Copenhagen together with the railway ferry/minelayer Hansestadt Danzig. Stettin is also one of two or three surviving vessels of the east Prussia evacuation fleet. From 1945 on, she was used by the waterway and navigation authorities in Hamburg on the river Elbe.

In 1981, Stettin was slated to be scrapped due to uneconomic costs. With the establishment of a development association, thousands of working hours, and support by generous sponsors, the ship was saved. Today, she is a technical culture monument. Her homeport is the museum port of Oevelgoenne in Hamburg, Germany. During summertime, Stettin cruises with guests on occasions like “Hamburg port birthday,” “Hansesail Rostock,” and “Kieler Woche,” and is also used as a charter vessel.


Information on the ice breaker SS ‘Stettin’ has been reproduced from Wiki Commons under the entry SS Stettin, as accessed last on May 25th, 2017. Wiki Commons is the only and absolute holder of the Copyright, and the information is hereby reproduced solely for education purposes. However, copyright for the images published here belong exclusively to Karatzas Images.


Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening. Detail of the innovative bow design at the time, Runeberg-bow, for breaking ice not by the weight of the ship but by a sharp cutting edge. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening. Detail of the innovative bow design at the time, Runeberg-bow, for breaking ice not by the weight of the ship but by a sharp cutting edge. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Only ice concerns now are for the ice used for cocktails served onboard! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Rare sight of a museum ship sailing: vintage icebreaker SS ‘Stettin’ enjoys the calm waters of the Elbe River on a sunny early summer evening, far away from its intended ice-infested seas. Retirement well earned! Image credit: Karatzas Images.

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

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Port of Hamburg (2)

More maritime and water-inspired pictures from the amazing City of Hamburg!

Take me to Your Port! Image Source: Basil Karatzas

Take me to Your Port! Image Source: Basil Karatzas

And your Beautiful Ships! Image source: Basil Karatzas

And your Beautiful Ships! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ships everywhere! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ships everywhere! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ships are part of the City's Architecture. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ships are part of the City’s Architecture. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Trading Ships with their Sails full! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Trading Ships with their Sails full! Image source: Basil Karatzas

And, One More! Image source: Basil Karatzas

And, One More! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Every Shipping Company's Building Should Have a Facade like this! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Every Shipping Company’s Building Should Have a Facade like this! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Just One of Hamburg's 2,300 Bridges! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Just One of Hamburg’s 2,300 Bridges! Image source: Basil Karatzas

And, One More Bridge! Image source: Basil Karatzas

And, One More Bridge! Image source: Basil Karatzas

For the Canals that Bind the City! Image source: Basil Karatzas

For the Canals that Bind the City! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Canal upstream Speicherstadt (Old Warehouse District) Image source: Basil Karatzas

Canal upstream Speicherstadt (Old Warehouse District) Image source: Basil Karatzas

Canals reaching Hamburg's Downtown. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Canals reaching Hamburg’s Downtown. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Nighttime has a special feel in Hamburg! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Nighttime has a special feel in Hamburg! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Figurehead of Windjammer Rickmer Rickmers. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Figurehead of Windjammer Rickmer Rickmers. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Hamburg's Port at Night! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Hamburg’s Port at Night! Image source: Basil Karatzas

© 2013-2014 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

 

Port of Hamburg

The City of Hamburg in Germany – formally known as Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg (Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg) – is a major shipping cluster and port city extraordinaire.

The city was established by the Emperor Charlemagne as a castle which he ordered constructed in 808 AD for the defenses of the northern borders of the empire.  That original castle was also crucial for providing strategic access through the Elbe River to the North Sea on the west and the Baltic Sea on the north-east. Nowadays the city itself is at the confluence of the rivers Alster and Bille; several buildings have their foundations on pylons and the city claims 2,300 bridges, more than any city in the world. Having a tradition of free spiritedness and self governance as independent city-state from its days as a free imperial city under the Holy Roman Empire (reporting to the Emperor rather than to a local prince) and access to the sea, Hamburg is a unique city in open mildness and culture.

The Port of Hamburg is about 110 kilometers from the mouth of River Elbe in the North Sea; based on latest statistics, it’s the third biggest port in Europe and the fifteenth worldwide in throughput with approximately 130 million tons of cargo moved in 2011.  Several hundred shipowners are based in Hamburg, the most notables in the recent days the so-called KG owners (Kommanditgesellschaft (abbreviated “KG”) for a limited partnership business entity.) Several of the world’s biggest shipping banks and vessel managers and also complimentary industries are based in Hamburg.

During a recent trip to Hamburg we managed to find the time for some sightseeing and picture taking:

Hamburg's Rathaus (City Hall but also Parliament for the city-state) Image source: Basil Karatzas

Hamburg’s Rathaus (City Hall but also Parliament for the city-state) Image source: Basil Karatzas

Rathaus (detail): The Seal of the City of Hamburg on the main tower. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Rathaus (detail): The Seal of the City of Hamburg on the main tower. Image source: Basil Karatzas

The Headquarters of HSH Nordbank, the biggest shipping bank. Image source: Basil Karatzas

The Headquarters of HSH Nordbank, the biggest shipping bank. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Statues everywhere! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Statues everywhere! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Modern monuments, too!  Here, a classic Mercedes 260 SEL model. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Modern monuments, too! Here, a classic Mercedes 260 SEL model. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ships and Nautical Themes are embedded to the Culture and Architecture. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ships and Nautical Themes are embedded to the Culture and Architecture. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Idle Containership Cranes are Waiting for the Market Recovery. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Idle Containership Cranes are Waiting for the Market Recovery. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Some Cranes Keep Selectively Busy. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Some Cranes Keep Selectively Busy. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ro-Ro Vessel MV LINK STAR Sailing Downstream. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Ro-Ro Vessel MV LINK STAR Sailing Downstream. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Gearless, feeder containership MV SYLT Sailing Downstream. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Gearless, feeder containership MV SYLT Sailing Downstream. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Containership Vessel MV MSC EMMA Undergoing her Second Special Survey in the B+V Floating Dock. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Containership Vessel MV MSC EMMA Undergoing her Second Special Survey in the B+V Floating Dock. Image source: Basil Karatzas

The Floating Dock under Flooding. Notice that the Bowthruster is now submerged. Image source: Basil Karatzas

The Floating Dock under Flooding. Notice that the Bowthruster is now submerged. Image source: Basil Karatzas

Popeye the Sailor Man and his girlfriend Oliver are part of the Nautical Theme! Image source: Basil Karatzas

Popeye the Sailor Man and his girlfriend Oliver are part of the Nautical Theme! Image source: Basil Karatzas                                                                                                                                                                                                                     © 2013-2014 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.