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Poseidon – The Olympian God of the Sea

According to Greek mythology and the story of the genesis of the gods of Olympus (Olympian Gods), Poseidon was the god of the sea and protector of all aquatic features. He spent most of his time in his watery domain, although he was officially one of the supreme gods of Mount Olympus. Also, while there were various rivers personified as gods, these would have been technically under Poseidon’s sway. Similarly, Nereus, the Old Man of the Sea, wasn’t really considered on a par with Poseidon, who was known to drive his chariot through the waves in unquestioned dominance. Poseidon had married Titan Oceanus‘ daughter, and sea-nymph Amphitrite.

Poseidon was a son of Cronus (the youngest of the 12 Titans) and of Cronus’s sister and consort Rhea, a fertility goddess. Poseidon was a brother of Zeus, the sky god and chief deity of ancient Greece, and of Hades, god of the underworld. When the three brothers deposed their father, the kingdom of the sea fell by lot to Poseidon. Zeus became ruler of the sky, Hades got dominion of the Underworld and Poseidon was given all water, both fresh and salt. Poseidon was widely worshipped by seamen.

His weapon and main symbol was the trident, perhaps once a fish spear, with which he could make the earth shake, causing earthquakes, and shatter any object. According to the Greek poet Hesiod, Poseidon’s trident, like Zeus’s thunderbolt and Hades’ helmet, was fashioned by the three Cyclopes. He was second to Zeus in power amongst the gods. He was considered by Greeks to have a difficult quarrelsome personality. Combined with his greed, he had a series of disputes with other gods during his various attempts to take over the cities they were patrons of.

In dividing heaven, the watery realm and the subterranean land of the dead, the Olympians agreed that the earth itself would be ruled jointly, with Zeus as king. This led to a number of territorial disputes among the gods. Poseidon vied with Athena to be patron deity of Athens. The god demonstrated his power and benevolence by striking the Acropolis with his three-pronged spear, which caused a spring of salt water to emerge. Athena, however, planted an olive tree, which was seen as a more useful favor. Her paramount importance to the Athenians is seen in her magnificent temple, the Parthenon, which still crowns the Acropolis. The people of Athens were careful, all the same, to honor Poseidon as well.

At one point , Poseidon desired Demeter. To deter him, Demeter asked him to make the most beautiful animal that the world had ever seen. So, in an effort to impress her, Poseidon created the first horse. In some accounts, his first attempts were unsuccessful and created a variety of other animals in his quest; thus, by the time the horse was created, his passion for Demeter had diminished. Poseidon himself fathered many horses, best known of which was the winged horse Pegasus by the Gorgon Medusa.

The Romans’ name for Poseidon was Neptune.


On a recent summer visit at the National Archeological Museum in Athens, we have had the opportunity to take several pictures of the statue of Poseidon of Melos. According to Wiki Commons:

The Poseidon of Melos is a statue of Poseidon in the National Archaeological Museum, Athens (NAMA), with the inventory number 235, which is dated to the last quarter of the second century BC.

The statue was found in 1877 on the island of Melos. It is made of Parian marble and has a height of 2.35 metres, which makes it more than lifesize. The statue was found in several pieces, which have been reattached to one another. Portions of the left foot and of the himation are modern recreations. Parts of the nose, beard and hair are missing.

The sea god is depicted naked to the waist in an awe-inspiring pose, with his muscular right arm raised, probably in order to hold a trident (now lost). His himation hangs around his hips, covering his legs and genitals; he holds it in place at his side with his left hand. His back is also partially covered; a bit of cloth lies, mysteriously suspended, on his left shoulder. His weight rests on his right leg, his left leg is left free. The musculature of his arms and his body generally are very finely worked. The head is slightly tilted to the left and his gaze is directed into the distance. There is a dolphin behind the statue to the right, which serves as an additional support for the weight of the statue. The pose is a standard one for Poseidon, Zeus and Hades.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Plaque at the base of statue ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Throwing his trident. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Upper torso detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Detail of the head. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Detail of the dolphin by the right foot of the statue. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. Detail of left hand supported at the waist, counter-balancing the right hand’s cast of the trident. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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‘Poseidon of Melos’. View from the back. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Image of Olympian god Poseidon: larger-than-life statue made of Parian marble, known as ‘Poseidon of Melos’. Discovered in shipwreck in 1877. ca 125-100 BC. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Temple of the god of the sea Poseidon propitiously situated at Cape Sounion, a sharp promontory ca 65 km south of Athens. Image credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Images of Panama City

We have had the opportunity to visit Panama City to present at the 1st MareForum Conference, Panama: Singapore of the Western Hemisphere, just two days ahead of the official Panama Canal opening with the expanded locks. Never a person to meet a bit, a few lovely memories and pictures from Panama City with its rich history and amazing architecture.

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Welcome to colorful Panama! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Welcome to colorful Panama! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. The F&F Tower (previously known as the Revolution Tower) of the green glass and twisted body stands out. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. The F&F Tower (previously known as the Revolution Tower) of the green glass and twisted body stands out. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. The F&F Tower (previously known as the Revolution Tower) of the green glass and twisted body stands out. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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An impressive skyline in Panama City, with high end residential towers and office buildings with avant garde architecture. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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Vasco Nunez de Balboa Square; first European to cross the Panama Isthmus (then) and reach the Pacific Ocean, in 15013. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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Vasco Nunez de Balboa Square; first European to cross the Panama Isthmus (then) and reach the Pacific Ocean, in 15013. Image credit: Karatzas Images

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View of the old city, Panama City. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.

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Bridge of the Americas (Puente de las Americas) spans the Panama Canal by Panama City and the Pacific Ocean. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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Bridge of the Americas (Puente de las Americas) spans the Panama Canal by Panama City and the Pacific Ocean. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

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A lighthouse stands attentive by the Pacific Ocean, Panama Canal. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Panama containership terminal. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Memories of Posidonia 2016

With Posidonia 2016 just behind us, we share herewith a few memorable moments caught on camera; sorry, but no images of people or private citizens, or gossip!

For those interested in a quick analysis and our take of Posidonia 2016, the article from the Maritime Executive ‘Posidonia 2016 at BDI 600’ may be worth reading.


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Posidonia Central Plaza – at the Heart of Shipping. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Posidonia 2016 – The Venue, having accommodated 22,000 visitors in 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Ah, Posidonia 2016 and the party scene! With the perfect background! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Model of liberty ship ‘Hellas Liberty’ on exhibit at Posidonia. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! ᾽Ναυπηγοἰ᾽ (Νaval Architects) in Ancient Greece were important people! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! ᾽Τριηροποιοι᾽ (Shipbuilders) in Ancient Greece were important people! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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No exhibition in Greece would had been complete without reference to history! And a model of a Trireme! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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From the old, to the new! Union Greek Shipowners (UGS) celebrating 100 years! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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A book about Swedish Shipping! Always we had a soft spot for Sverige! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Who said romance is dead? Great way to attract attention to one’s booth! Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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The section for Japan at Posidonia. We always had a soft spot for the Country of the Rising Sun, too! Credit Image: Karatzas Images

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His Excellency, the Ambassador of Japan to Greece, Mr Masuo Nishibayashi, speaking at the Japan’s Ship Exporters Association reception. Credit Image: Karatzas Images

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The Minister of State for Transport of the UK, Mr Robert Goodwill MP, speaking at the British Residence, British Embassy in Athens during Posidonia 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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A World-class Maritime Centre: Maritime UK – at the British Residence, British Embassy in Athens during Posidonia 2016. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ main ferry port, ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ heavily listing. For more images, please see Images of Ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ main ferry port, ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ heavily listing. For more images, please see Images of Ferry ‘Panagia Tinou’ listing in Port of Piraeus. Image Credit: Karatzas Images

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Taking a stroll in Piraeus’ containership terminal, 9,300-teu vessel MV ‘CMA CGM Arkansas’ unloading containers at the Cosco terminal. Image Credit: Karatzas Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Flying Qatar Airways on (Shipping) Business

One of the real benefits of working in the shipping industry is the pleasure of frequent traveling, as far as we are concerned. Flying around the world to visit with clients, business associates and friends, on a frequent basis, is the trademark of a successful shipping person. After all, shipping is an industry that requires social interaction and educated faith in the counter-party, as one of premises of our business has been “Our Word Is Our Bond”. It takes many years of experience and traveling, personal interaction and due diligence for a shipping professional to know when a words equals unequivocally to a bond.

When it comes to traveling, we considered ourselves experienced ‘road warriors’ having achieved gold and diamond memberships with several airlines, hotel chains, rental car companies, etc over our years in shipping. After 9/11, traveling is not as painless as one may have wished, but again, we have been about the seven seas and five ocean and the seven continents; well, almost… As such, we have been accustomed to certain inconveniences of modern travel and have built a list of preferred ‘vendors’.

But again, being open minded, pleased trying new venues and routes and localities.

We were really excited when our travel agent offered a booking on Qatar Airways for a trip to Southeast Asia and Far East / Japan, and we were looking forward to be through a new transport hub, Doha’s Hamad International Airport. Having now experienced some of the trip, we are typing this posting to express that we are just a tad disappointed with the overall experience, so much so that we post this ‘evaluation’ analysis on our blog, typically dealing with maritime matters.

The flight QR704 was planned to depart JFK Airport from New York on Saturday April 2nd at 11:14 EDT, arriving at Doha Hamad Intenrational Airport at 06:45 local time next day, and at 7:30 am to depart for Singapore on Flight QR944; a bit tight connection, but based on our travel experience, we have caught tighter scheduled in busier airports. Soon, however, things started going wrong. The airplane didn’t connect to the departing gate until about an hour before scheduled departure – indicating that the delay was an airline issue and not an airport issue; the crew were waiting along with the passengers at Gate 4 well passed the scheduled departure time, too. All in all, NO public announcement update was offered until 45 minutes passed the scheduled time; eventually, the flight took of at 12:30 pm, appr. 75 minutes delayed. Still, we thought, we were OK on time. The flight landed at 7:10 am local time in Doha, that is 20 minutes before our scheduled connect flight. In short, we missed the connect flight, and we were referred to the ground crew to ‘feel our pain’.

To make a long story short, the next flight for Qatar Airways from Doha to Singapore was not until 20:15 pm, QR942, THIRTEEN long hours later. An alternative option was offered through Dubai, but it was only shaving a couple of hours; that’s all.

The irony of the thing is that our Flight QR942 was delayed AGAIN, with the board showing departure at 21:15 hours, local time Doha, as the new departure time; to make a long story ever shorter, eventually Flight QR942 departed at 22:20 hours from Doha, a whole FIFTEEN hour delay form original schedule, arriving to Singapore late in Monday morning (instead of Sunday night) as planned – and having to cancel three business meetings in Singapore on Monday morning. And, having left New York on Saturday morning, we arrived in Singapore on Monday morning, two days later and FIFTEEN hours behind schedule.

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Traditional Dhow sailing boats in Doha. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Again, flights are known to be getting delayed, but here, two flights we ever got to fly in our whole life with Qatar Airways were delayed by way of more than one hour, each. Two for two!

To further exaggerate the pain, no proper announcements or explanations were offered to keep passengers updated for the delays with BOTH occasions. Probably, passengers like to stay in the dark, some may presume?

There were FIVE people in the NY flight heading eventually to Singapore, and ALL FIVE missed their flight; so, misery does love company – in this case, Qatar Airways’ company, we presume? There were people in the New York flight who were heading to Johannesburg and Sydney, and as far as we can tell, they also missed their connect flights.  Thus, we were not the only ones to be highly inconvenienced.

We have been in similar situations in the past, but, as in the case with a Lufthansa fight in Frankfurt in January from Athens to new York, ground crew were at the gate to pick up late arriving passengers and lead them through airport shortcuts and past long lines to their connect flights; on several cases, connect flights were delayed just to accommodate the tardy arrivals, just this Lufthansa case. But, this was not the case with Qatar Airways. No people on the ground to help, no effort to delay the connect flight by fifteen minutes in order for FIVE people to make the connect flight to Singapore. NO EFFORT WHATSOEVER!

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Dhow sailing boats against the Doha skyline. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

The strange thing is that Qatar Airways and Doha wish to advertise themselves as major contenders in the travel industry, BUT if there is a FOURTEEN-hour gap to connect the hub (Doha) with a major airport (Singapore), it seems there is a major connectivity problem; other hubs and airlines have much more frequent flights to major cities like Singapore. Qatar Airways and Hamad International Airport cannot possibly compete in a connected world if there are such blatant gaps in their network (two miserably delayed flights, no announcements, fifteen hours for connect flight to a major city like Singapore).

We were offered a free stay at an airport hotel in Doha, but we would rather first get herpes before we stay at another airport hotel… We would rather had been on time to Singapore on Sunday evening, to relax and prepare for Monday’s morning. And, without trying to be pompous, our stay in Singapore was scheduled at the Shangri-la Hotel… what a trade! Does Qatar Airways gets to pay for the lost night we paid for the Shangri-La?

And, for everyone wondering whether the 2014-delivery Hamad International Airport is a pleasure to pass through, we can spare them the agony. Mundane architecture and outlay, only a handful of restaurants, extremely limited shopping, too few restrooms that are too hard to spot, and power plugs for laptops and smart phones that had no power, at least at Gate C2 for the QR942; a sorry experience really, having no way to re-charge a phone after being delayed for FIFTEEN hours, in-between to long-haul flights.

And, despite the fact that in both cases the airplanes were modern Airbuses A350, we found the overall experience flying Qatar Airways rather un-inspiring, to be polite. The overall experience has left much to be desired, and likely not to be repeated.

As much as we enjoyed Doha (Souq Waqif and Corniche and watching Dhow sailing boats – while doing some sight-seeing, making the best of a bad situation,) again, we’d rather had gone as planned with our lives. Taking TWO days to fly from New York to Singapore is an un-acceptable experience in our modern world that moves fast.

Hopefully Qatar Airways will get to do the right thing next time…

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Doha skyline. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

 

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Visualizing Shipping Business (and more!) in Hamburg

Hamburg (officially Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg (Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg)), is the second largest city in Germany with a population is over 1.7 million people. The city is situated on the river Elbe. Hamburg is on the southern point of the Jutland Peninsula, between Continental Europe to the south and Scandinavia to the north, with the North Sea to the west and the Baltic Sea to the north-east. It is on the River Elbe at its confluence with the Alster and Bille. The city center is around the Binnenalster (“Inner Alster”) and Außenalster (“Outer Alster”), both formed by damming the River Alster to create lakes.

The city of Hamburg is one of 16 German states, therefore the Mayor of Hamburg‘s office corresponds more to the role of a minister-president than to the one of a city mayor. As a German state government, it is responsible for public education, correctional institutions and public safety; as a municipality, it is additionally responsible for libraries, recreational facilities, sanitation, water supply and welfare services.

Since 1897, the seat of the government has been the Hamburg Rathaus, with the office of the mayor, the meeting room for the Senate and the floor for the Hamburg Parliament. The Hamburg Rathaus is a richly decorated Neo-Renaissance building finished in 1897. The tower is 112 meters (367 ft) high. Its façade, 111 m (364 ft) long, depicts the emperors of the Holy Roman Empire, since Hamburg was, as a Free Imperial City, only under the sovereignty of the emperor. The Chilehaus, a brick expressionist office building built in 1922 and designed by architect Fritz Höger, is shaped like an ocean liner.

Hamburg is made up of seven boroughs (German: Bezirke) and subdivided into 104 quarters (German: Stadtteile). There are 181 localities (German: Ortsteile). The urban organization is regulated by the Constitution of Hamburg and several laws. Most of the quarters were former independent cities, towns or villages annexed into Hamburg proper. The last large annexation was done through the Greater Hamburg Act of 1937, when the cities Altona, Harburg and Wandsbek were merged into the state of Hamburg. The Act of the Constitution and Administration of Hanseatic city of Hamburg established Hamburg as a state and a municipality.

The many streams, rivers and canals are crossed by some 2,500 bridges, more than London, Amsterdam and Venice put together. Hamburg has more bridges inside its city limits than any other city in the world and more canals than Amsterdam and Venice combined.

The Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg opened in the HafenCity quarter in 2008. There are various specialised museums in Hamburg, such as the Archaeological Museum Hamburg (Archäologisches Museum Hamburg) in Hamburg-Harburg, the Museum of Labour (Museum der Arbeit), and several museums of local history, for example the Kiekeberg Open Air Museum (Freilichtmuseum am Kiekeberg). Two museum ships near Landungsbrücken bear witness to the freight ship (Cap San Diego) and cargo sailing ship era (Rickmer Rickmers).

History

The official name reflects its history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, as a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state, and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state. Prior to the constitutional changes in 1919, the stringent civic republic was ruled by a class of hereditary grand burghers or Hanseaten.

Claudius Ptolemy (2nd century AD) reported the first name for the vicinity as Treva.

The name Hamburg comes from the first permanent building on the site, a castle which the Emperor Charlemagne ordered constructed in AD 808. It rose on rocky terrain in a marsh between the River Alster and the River Elbe as a defence against Slavic incursion, and acquired the name Hammaburg, burg meaning castle or fort. The origin of the Hamma term remains uncertain, as does the exact location of the castle.

In 1189, by imperial charter, Frederick I “Barbarossa” granted Hamburg the status of an Imperial Free City and tax-free access up the Lower Elbe into the North Sea. In 1265, an allegedly forged letter was presented to or by the Rath of Hamburg. This charter, along with Hamburg’s proximity to the main trade routes of the North Sea and Baltic Sea, quickly made it a major port in Northern Europe. Its trade alliance with Lübeck in 1241 marks the origin and core of the powerful Hanseatic League of trading cities. On 8 November 1266, a contract between Henry III and Hamburg’s traders allowed them to establish a hanse in London. This was the first time in history that the word hanse was used for the trading guild of the Hanseatic League.

The Speicherstadt was declared a World Heritage Site by the UNESCO in July 2015.

Port of Hamburg

With appr. 8.8 million standard containers (TEU) handled in 2015, Hamburg is the third largest container port in Europe and in the 18th place on the list of the world’s largest container ports. Around 10,000 ship calls per year, almost 300 berths along a total of 43 kilometers of quay walls for seagoing vessels, more than 1,100 freight trains per week, four state-of-the-art container terminals and around 50 facilities specialized in handling project shipments and bulk cargoes, along with about 7,300 logistics firms within the city limits – these are just a few of the factors making the Port of Hamburg one of the world’s most flexible, high-performance universal ports. Last year 137.8 million tons of cargo crossed the quay walls of Germany’s largest seaport.


During our extensive traveling to Hamburg in the last several years, on shipping and shipping finance business, we have been amazed by the rich culture, architecture, ambiance, and friendliness and hospitality of the people of Hamburg. But again, in all fairness, we never visited a port city we didn’t like! The open-mindless of the people, the long established traditions, the vivacity in life and, yes, the “saltiness” of the night life (they call it Reeperbahn in Hamburg!) are always heart-warming to the sailors of the world! We have been posting images of ships calling the Port of Hamburg over time to our Karatzas Photographie Maritime blog; we have collected so many more nautical and maritime-inspired images and architectural decorations from throughout Hamburg, which we decided to share here! Enjoy Hamburg!


 

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St. Michael’s Church (“Michel”) and Museum Ship ‘Rickmer Rickmers’; Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

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Port of Hamburg, Containership Terminals in a chilly and foggy February day. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

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Nautically-inspired architectural detail from Hamburg. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

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Shipping cannot exist without trade. Hermes (or Mercury), God of Trade. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

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Female figures Frauenfiguren „Flüsternde Wellen“ (‘Whispering Waves’) at Kontorhaus Elbhof, Steinhöft 9, in Baumwall in Hamburg’s Neustadt. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime images.

Stella Haus_Four Reliefs_cropped_Hamburg BMK_8915 2015 @

It’s all about ships and shipping! Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Boat_Relief_Stella Haus_BMK_8859 2015 @

Details from the Stella Haus facade. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Boat_Square Sail Hamburg BMK_8889 2015 @

Details from the Stella Haus facade. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Boat_Square Sail_Caduceus_BMK_8863 2015 @

Details from the Stella Haus facade. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Boat_Square Sail_Left_Hamburg_BMK_8884 2015 @

Details from the Stella Haus facade. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Canals_BMK_3985_Feb2016 @

Two-thousand, five hundred bridges in Hamburg… Not a place to burn bridges…. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Allianz Roof_BMK_4166_FEB2016 @

Roof of the building of the Allianz Insurance Company in Trostbrücke in Hamburg. Just magnificent! Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Allianz Roof_BMK_4226_FEB2016 @

Roof of the building of the Allianz Insurance Company in Trostbrücke in Hamburg. View from another angle. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Galleon Roof_Allianz_BMK_4136_FEB2016 @

Roof of the building of the Allianz Insurance Company in Trostbrücke in Hamburg. Detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Poseidon_Allianz_BMK_4117_FEB2016 @

Roof of the building of the Allianz Insurance Company in Trostbrücke in Hamburg. Poseidon, God of the Seas. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Steamship_Allianz Roof_BMK_4139_FEB2016 @

Roof of the building of the Allianz Insurance Company in Trostbrücke in Hamburg. Detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Relief_Anchor_BMK_3559_FEB2016 @

Anchoring an architectural detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.

Hamburg_Rathaus_partial_roof_BMK_3722_FEB2016 @

Hamburg’s Rathaus, detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Maritime Images.


Information provided herewith has mostly been extracted from the “Hamburg” entry in Wikipedia and the website of the Port of Hamburg, which hold all copyrights to the material. Copyright for all images herewith belong to Karatzas Maritime Images, 2016.


 

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Happy New Year!

 

                                  Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co

                                                    Wishes you

            A most Prosperous, Productive, Happy New Year 2016!

This year’s theme are pictures of commercial ships calling the New York Harbor. The Statue of Liberty, Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, the newly opened World Trade Center, the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge, the Empire State Building, and the lower Manhattan skyline can be seen in most images. One World Financial Center, where our offices are located, can be seen in the shadow and in front of the World Trade Center! We are located on the 30th floor of a 39-floor building, shadowed one city block north-east by the 104-floor (1776 ft) World Trade Center.

Shipping is both our vocation and avocation!

    Happy New Year!

WTC_night_Empire State Building_BMK_2420

Car Carrier entering the New York Harbor at night; World Trade Center and the Empire State Building in all their glory! Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC ContaainershipS BMK_4827 AUG2015

Cruiseships ‘Celebrity Summit’ (upstream) and ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ (downstream) crossing paths. Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges barely visible to the extreme right. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC_NY Fire Department_BMK_4217

Fire fighting vessel ‘Fire Fighter II’ of the City of New York Fire Department in action, framing the lower Manhattan skyline. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC StatueOfLiberty Chemical Tanker BMK_4109 AUG2015

Chemical Tanker MT ‘Harbour Progress’ and fire-fighting vessel MV ‘Fire Fighter II’ against Lower Manhattan skyline and the Statue of Liberty (extreme left). Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC_Norwegian Breakaway_Fort Wadsworth_BMK_0784

Cruiseship ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departing New York on a rainy, summer evening. Fort Wadsworth in the foreground. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC_Queen Mary II_BMK_1027

Cruiseship ‘Queen May 2’ departing New York (from her Brooklyn dock) on a rainy, summer afternoon. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

Verrazano_Cruiseship_Queen Mary2_JUN2015

Cruiseship ‘Queen Mary 2’ outbound passing under the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge (connecting Staten Island and Brooklyn). Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

Statue of LIberty_Cruiseship Aurora_BMK_9056

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ outbound with Staten Island and the Statue of Liberty in the background. Picture taken from Battery Park. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

Star Epsilon_Bulker_Statue of LIberty_WM

Bulker ‘Star Epsilon’ upstream the Hudson River on a rainy, winter day; Picture taken from Battery Park. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC_Statue of Liberty_Barge_BMK_1899

Tug and tank-barge at anchor with Statue of Liberty, World Trade Center in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC Cosco Asphalt BMK_5185 AUG2015

Asphalt tanker ‘Cosco Asphalt’ inbound; Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

WTC_Eagle Ford_BMK_1991

Built in 1978, Jones Act 124,000 tanker MT ‘Eagle Ford’ during lightering operations with Lower Manhattan sklyline in the background. Fort Wadsworth in the foreground. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

 

Key West Beach Rules

Treasure Hunting in Key West, Florida…

Of writers and poets and pirates                                                                                                           who walked the dirt beneath this path                                                                                                  each carrying a pocket full of dreams.                                                                                                    And none as unusual as yours,                                                                                                              but all of which came true.                                                                                                                                                  David L. Sloan                                                                                                                                                

Kew West_There's no place I'd rather be

Key West, There’s no place I’d rather be

Of poets and dreamers_SLOAN

Of writers, poets and pirates…

Write your worries in the sand

Write your worries in the sand… and let the sea wash them away

You can shake the sand off your shoes

Sand never leaves the soul…

Happines is

Toes in the water…

Home is where the ocean meets the shore

Where the ocean meets the shore…

sandy toes and salty kisses

Sandy toes and salty kisses!

Go jump in the ocean

Go jump in the ocean! – Can never be taken as an insult!

If you are lucky enough to be at the beach

if you are lucky enough to be at the beach…

On beach time

On beach time…

Beach rules

Beach rules…

Beach rules 2

And, more beach rules…

Captain's Rules

And, some Captain’s rules…

Crew knows best

The crew knows best!

same ship...different day

Same ship…different day! Not a good motto for a shipbroker!

No working on drinking hours

No working during drinking hours! – Well, how a shipbroker is supposed to get anything done then?

Dream require wide open seas

Wild dreams, open seas!

Inner compass

Inner compass!

Best ships are friendships

Best ships are friendSHIPS!

Shell warehouse

She sells sea shells by the sea shore! Key West!

Bart Roberts

‘In an honest service there is thin commons, low wages and hard labor; in this plenty and satiety, pleasure and ease, liberty and power… No, a merry life and a short one will be my motto.’                                                                                  Captain Bartholomew ‘Black Bart’ Roberts, Pirate

As legendary Steve Jobs once said: ‘It’s more fun to be a pirate than to join the Navy’!


 

© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information here within has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.